Terms used in freight forwarding such as delivered duty unpaid,deadweight tonnage,deck cargo,deconsolidation point

 The information provided here is part of Online export import business guide course

 


Terms used in freight forwarding such as delivered duty unpaid,deadweight tonnage,deck cargo,deconsolidation point etc.

 

 

This post explains about terms used in freight forwarding such as delivered at terminal,delivered duty unpaid,deadweight tonnage,deck cargo,deconsolidation point,delivery carrier,delivery order ,demurrage,delivered ex ship etc.These terms used in international business are arranged in alphabetical order and you may add more information about terms used in export business at the end of this article, if you wish.

 

Terms used in freight forwarding

 

DAT (Delivered At Terminal) :This term is used for any type of shipments. The shipper/seller pays for carriage to the terminal, except for costs related to import clearance, and assumes all risks up to the point that the goods are unloaded at the terminal.

 

DDC - A charge assessed by the carrier for handling positioning of a full container within the container yard.

 

 

 

DDC :Destination delivery charge. An accessorial charge to deliver at destination.

 

DDP Delivered Duty Paid (named place of destination) - Incoterms:The seller fulfils his obligation to deliver when the goods have been made available at an agreed point at the named place in the country of importation, often the buyer's premises. The seller has to bear the risks and all costs, including duties, taxes and other charges of delivering the goods thereto, cleared for importation. This term should not be used if the seller is unable directly or indirectly to obtain any necessary import licence or approval. This term may be used for all modes of transport.

DDQ (Delivered Duty Unpaid):This arrangement is basically the same as with DDP, except for the fact that the buyer is responsible for the duty, fees and taxes.

 

DDU Delivered Duty Unpaid (named place of destination) – Incoterms:The seller fulfils his obligation to deliver when the goods have been made available at an agreed point at the named place in the country of importation. The seller has to bear the risks and all costs and other charges of delivering the goods thereto, but not including duties and taxes. The buyer is responsible for customs clearance, and if he fails to do this, he is responsible for the consequences. This term may be used for all modes of transport.

 

DDU -Delivered Duty Unpaid (INCOTERM)

 

Dead Space:Space in a car, truck, vessel, etc., that is not utilized.

 

Terms used in freight forwarding such as delivered duty unpaid,deadweight tonnage,deck cargo,deconsolidation point etc

Deadfreight:Slots paid for but not used.

 

Dead-head:a portion of a transportation trip in which no freight is conveyed; an empty move. Transportation equipment is often dead-headed because of imbalances in supply and demand. For example, many more containers are shipped from Asia to North America than in reverse; empty containers are therefore dead-headed back to Asia.

 

Deadweight (D.W.) :The number of tons of cargoes, stores and bunker fuel a ship can carry and transport. Also see "Deadweight Tonnage".

 

Deadweight Tonnage(DWT)-Deadweight or Carrying capacity of a vessel. It is the sum total weight in tonnes of all the cargo, provisions, fuel, passengers, crew, fresh water, and dunnage that the vessel can carry when loaded down to her maximum draught marks.

 

 

Deadweight:Abbreviation: DWT The total weight of cargo, cargo equipment, bunkers, provisions, water, stores and spare parts which a vessel can lift when loaded to her maximum draught as applicable under the circumstances. The dead-weight is expressed in tons.

 

Deadweight:the number of long tons that a vessel can transport of cargo, supplies and fuel. It is the difference between the number of tons of water a vessel displaces 'light' (empty) and the number of tons it displaces when submerged to the 'load line'.

 

DECK CARGO:Cargo carried outside rather than within the enclosed cargo spaces of a vessel.

 

Declaration of Dangerous Goods: To comply with the U.S. regulations, exporters are required to provide special notices to inland and ocean transport companies when goods are hazardous.

 

DECLARED VALUE FOR CARRIAGE: By declaring a higher value for carriage a shipper can increase the carrier’s legal liability

 

DECLARED VALUE FOR CUSTOMS: A value declared by a shipper for Customs purposes and may be used in the assessment of duties and taxes

 

Declared Value: The value of the goods, declared by the shipper on a bill of lading, for the purpose of determining a freight rate or the limit of the carrier's liability. Also used by customs as the basis for calculation of duties, etc. Deferred Shipping: Delivery of non-critical shipments.

 

Deconsolidation Point - Place where loose (LCL) or other non-containerized cargo is ungrouped for delivery.

 

Deductible (also known as“Excess”)-The amount, under an Insurance Policy, that the Insurer deducts from the claim amount when making the remittance to the claimant.

 

Degroupage:The ability, in a given time, of a resource measured in quality and quantity The quantity of goods which can be stored in or loaded into a warehouse, store and/or loaded into a means of transport at a particular time.

 

DELAY:Even under All Risk coverage, damage due to delay is not recoverable. Most underwriters have inserted a "Delay Cause" in the Open Cargo Policy, which states specifically that damage caused by delay is not recoverable even if the delay was due to a peril insured against.

 

Delivery Carrier- An Air freight term. The carrier who effects delivery at final destination in accordance with the Air Waybill. n.b. Commonly, all are same carrier except where an agent is involved or where a transhipment has been effected.(IATA)

 

Delivery Instructions - Order to pick up or deliver goods at a named place and deliver the cargo or empty container to a pier. Also known as shipping delivery order.

 

Delivery Instructions:Also called delivery Orders, these documents provide specific information to a carrier regarding delivery to a specific port, pier, terminal, airport, or steamship line. They show the shipping carrier, delivery deadlines, name and address of consignee, and the contact name and telephone number of the shipper n case of delivery problems.

 

Delivery Note:A document recording the delivery of products to a consignee (customer).

 

Delivery Order (Pier Release) - Issued by the consignee or his customs broker to the ocean carrier as authority to release the cargo to the inland carrier. Includes all data necessary for the pier delivery clerk to determine that the cargo can be released to the domestic carrier.

 

Delivery Receipt: Document a consignee or its agent dates and signs at delivery, stating the condition of the goods at delivery. The driver takes the signed delivery receipt to the service center for retention. The customer retains the remaining copy.

 

Delivery Service:Bringing goods to a destination on behalf of a shipper for a fee.

 

Delivery-Duty-Paid: Supplier/manufacturer arrangement in which suppliers are responsible for the transport of the goods they have produced, which is being sent to a manufacturer. This responsibility includes tasks such as ensuring products get through Customs.

 

Demurrage - A penalty charge against shippers or consignees for delaying the carrier's equipment beyond the allowed free time. The free time and demurrage charges are set forth in the charter party or freight tariff. - See also Detention and Per Diem.

 

Denied Party List (DPL): A listing of all the entities with whom a company cannot do business due to company policy or government requirements. The Export DPL list is based on information supplied by the United States Government Federal Register and other sources.

 

DEQ (Delivered Ex Quay):In this arrangement, the buyer/consignee is responsible for duties and charges and the seller is responsible for delivering the goods to the quay, wharf or port of destination. In a reversal of previous practice, the buyer must also arrange for customs clearance.

 

DEQ- Delivered Ex Quay (INCOTERM)DES Delivered ex Ship (named port of destination) – Incoterms:The seller makes the goods available to the buyer on board the ship at the destination port, and is responsible for all costs and risks until that point, as well as arrival within the given period. Typically this term would be used for bulk cargo on a chartered ship.

 

DES -Delivered Ex Ship (INCOTERM)

The above details describes about terms called in freight forwarding such as delivered at terminal,delivered duty unpaid,deadweight tonnage,deck cargo,deconsolidation point,delivery carrier,delivery order ,demurrage,delivered ex ship etc.These phrases may help importers and exporters on their day to day business activities. The readers can also add more information about terms used in overseas trade below this post. Terms used in freight forwarding such as Customs Value,Cut-off date or time,Container Yard,Delivered at Frontier

 

 

The above information is a part of Guide on howtoexport and import 



Related posts about free online training on import business:

 

 

How to import your product?
Click here to know HS code of your product
12 Major risks and solutions in Imports and Exports
Different types of export containers
How to get GSP certificate of origin in India?
Types of export containers
Foreign Trade Policy of India 2015-20
Who are authorized to issue Certificate of origin under India Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement
How to get Certificate of origin under India Chile Preferential Trade Agreement
What is IHC – Inland Haulage Charges
What is intensive exam CET exam in US import clearance
What is Inter Unit Transfer (IUT) in STP
Is Customs House Agents (CHA ) required to be appointed mandatory?






Discussion Forum

You can also share your thoughts about this article.
Any one can answer on question posted by Readers